Brightside is a national charity which provides free online resources for students, and as a high proportion of you are cash-strapped and love free stuff, we thought it only fair to tell you all about it. Firstly, there's Bright Knowledge, which is full of great advice whether you're planning what to take for Freshers Week, working out which course to choose, or looking for advice about budgeting when you're two terms into your final year and suffering from a severe case of hungry wallet syndrome.

Brightside is a national charity which provides free online resources for students, and as a high proportion of you are cash-strapped and love free stuff, we thought it only fair to tell you all about it. Firstly, there's Bright Knowledge, which is full of great advice whether you're planning what to take for Freshers Week, working out which course to choose, or looking for advice about budgeting when you're two terms into your final year and suffering from a severe case of hungry wallet syndrome.

Useful Resources: Brightside

Posted in Undergraduate Finance Advice

 

Brightside is a national charity which provides free online resources for students, and as a high proportion of you are cash-strapped and love free stuff, we thought it only fair to tell you all about it.

Firstly, there’s Bright Knowledge, which is full of great advice whether you’re planning what to take for Freshers Week, working out which course to choose, or looking for advice about budgeting when you’re two terms into your final year and suffering from a severe case of hungry wallet syndrome. 

Bright Knowledge also covers career paths, education news and advice on independent living at university.  All these resources are free, and put together by experts, so we recommend that you spend some time looking through the site’s resources.

If  you’re looking for help budgeting when you start at university, Brightside has also developed an amazing resource, the student calculator, which will help you to work out how much money you’ll receive in the form of maintenance loans and maintenance grants whilst you’re studying, as well as planning your budget based on how much you’ll earn (and be given by kind family members), and how much you’ll be spending on things like rent, bills, food, transport and going out.   

The great thing about this is that you can log in to save your budget, so you can keep track of things, adjust what you plan to spend if necessary, and keep on top of your finances throughout the year.  If you don’t arrive at university with a clear idea of how much you can afford to spend each month, you may find yourself coming unstuck in your final term, when it’s much more important to be thinking about exams and dissertations than overdrafts and angry letters from your bank.